Question: I created one child for print, and another for the web

Question: I created one child for print, and another for the web
Is there a difference? Can you tell the difference?

Answer:

Answer:
The child created for the web is a lot shorter and much more active.

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Writing for new media is different

Writing for new media and the web has unique payoffs and pitfalls. Using them will help us write copy that appears before more readers and holds their attention longer. Let's share our tips for writing copy that will spark interest, maintain reader involvement, and place highly in search results.

Let's also discuss non-copy elements - widgets, RSS feeds, polls, imbedded video, photos, and killer graphics - that we use to engage the reader. We need every trick: readers are just one click away from other compelling articles and videos...and they know it.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Some say "A," it's a different animal.

I asked the same question on LinkedIn, and got feedback that people thought writing for new media demanded a completely different skill set. True, hypertext can provide detail without slowing down the copy, and copy chunks have to be a lot shorter.

2 comments:

brieannawilkoff said...

Maybe it's a little bit of both. I would certainly think good writers would be good writers no matter what the format. But by the same token, I would assume good writers would want to tailor their writing for the specific medium, as well as the audience. I do believe there are enough differences between print and new media that a skilled writer will take what he or she knows and tweak it to best fit in this unique arena.

Crankowski said...

Thanks, Brie. The heart of the issue is the size of the tweak. Is it enough of a change to justify considering digital media a different animal? Opinions differ, but there is in fact a lot to learn.